Ukraine says thieves in law helped Russia annex Crimea

Ukraine says thieves in law helped Russia annex Crimea
Vyacheslav Abroskin

Vyacheslav Abroskin believes that the influence of criminal leaders extends from control over the collection of money obtained by criminal means to control in the field of energy and natural resources extraction.

The first deputy head of the National Police, Vyacheslav Abroskin, claims that Russia annexed Crimea because the criminal leaders who were in the Crimean Verkhovna Rada, the government and law enforcement agencies of Crimea, actively contributed to this.

Abroskin quoted an excerpt from Mark Galeotti's The Vory in a Facebook post, which said that the head of the Crimea, Sergei Aksyonov, has a criminal past.

“Sergei Aksyonov, the premier of the new Crimean region, is alleged to have had a vor past, having gone by the nickname of ‘Goblin’ back when he was a member of the Salem organised crime group in the 1990s,” wrote Abroskin.

According to him, in those days, the blocking and seizure of Ukrainian military units on the peninsula was organized at the initial stage with the support of thieves in law and other bosses.

Now, according to Abroskin, if anything, the Crimean crime leaders have strengthened their positions.

“They take an active part in all the processes of the country, their representatives have recently integrated into all the country’s power and law enforcement structures,” he wrote.

The deputy head of the National Police states that their influence extends from control over the collection of money obtained by criminal means to control in the field of energy and natural resources.


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