Usmanov’s stepson to build Renovation buildings

Usmanov’s stepson to build Renovation buildings
Anton Viner Photo: Evgenia Guseva / PhotoXPress

Moscow authorities may buy apartments from developers should the city lack enough launch sites.

The Moscow City Administration will buy apartments for the Renovation Program from several companies that may include one associated with Alisher Usmanov’s stepson Anton Viner. According to Vedomosti, Moscow authorities may buy apartments from developers should the city lack enough launch sites. The mayor's office arranged with the developer of the premises of Peter Alexeev’s Moscow fine-wool factory in May that the city will get 80 to 90 apartments from it. MTPFA OJSC and Mikhalkovskaya LLC invested in this project. This is a problem area, where 194.000 sq. meters of real estate are to be built.

At the beginning of 2017, MTTPA bought a factory construction project for 2.93 billion rubles ($49.3m). According to people close to the company, it operates in the interests of Blagosostoyaniye, a private pension fund.

The project's website stated that the management company Blagosostoyaniye Rodiny (Welfare of the Motherland), 49% of which belongs to Rodina Stroi Group, signed contracts with interest-holders. This firm is controlled by Anton Viner, the son of Irina Viner (he owns about a third of the project). Irina is Alisher Usmanov’s wife.

Pioner Group may become another company that will be selling apartments under the Renovation Program. The authorities want to buy about 200 apartments on Gzhatskaya Street from the company. The housing may be purchased if it is suitable in terms of apartment layouts, pricing and the standards.

Over 4.000 buildings are going to be emptied and demolished under the forced Renovation Program. The Moscow Civil Construction Board instructed house-building plants to develop a technical design for buildings with 9, 17 and 25 floors. Earlier, Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin had said that the program for renovating five-story buildings in Moscow in 15 years could cost 3 trillion rubles ($50.5bn).

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