Germany to look into media reports on property allegedly owned by Russian oligarch Rotenberg despite sanctions

Germany to look into media reports on property allegedly owned by Russian oligarch Rotenberg despite sanctions
Kudamm-Karree, a building complex in Berlin

According to the media reports, the total value of all real property items owned by the oligarch’s companies is about €1 billion.

German law enforcement agencies received materials needed to check the research of some German media into the real estate belonging to the Russian oligarch Arkady Rotenberg in Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt and Hamburg. The Bundestag deputy Fabio De Masi, who initiated the probe, said that although he was not a supporter of the sanctions on Russia, the check is necessary. The deputy believes that law enforcement bodies absolutely have to see if the reports are true. "It’s quite obvious that some dirty money keeps getting laundered in Germany," De Masi said.

Yesterday, the Berliner Zeitung newspaper and the television and radio company SWR presented a joint investigation with materials evidencing Arkady Rotenberg’s links to the companies that buy German real estate in bulk. In particular, they believe Berlin’s building complex Kudamm-Karree that includes a shopping center, a skyscraper, theaters and offices might be associated with the oligarch. The investors are planning to demolish a number of historical buildings in Kudamm-Karree to build a new shopping center there. The investigation mentions Munich’s Opera House, Hamburg’s LES 1 office complex, Frankfurt’s Sofitel Hotel and Berlin’s Stue Hotel. According to the reporters, the total value of all real property items owned by the oligarch’s companies is about €1 billion.

A certain Michael Oppenheim (Mikhail Opengeim) is named as one of the links in the complex network of companies, offshore ones including, and is considered a person closely associated with the Rotenbergs.

The businessman’s spokesperson said he had nothing to do with the real estate in Germany, adding that for a person affected by the sanctions, European investments are simply a risky venture.

"Firstly, neither he nor the companies associated with him have anything to do with said property. Secondly, he has never met any of the persons and/or companies the article mentioned," Rotenberg’s spokesperson stated.

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