Ex-GRU Colonel Skripal and his daughter were poisoned in their house in Salisbury 

Ex-GRU Colonel Skripal and his daughter were poisoned in their house in Salisbury
The police take away flowers from the grave of Skripal’s wife and son in Salisbury

There is a new lead in the nerve agent poisoning of the former Russian General Staff Main Military Intelligence Directorate (GRU) officer, convicted for espionage in favor of Great Britain in Russia.

Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yuliya are likely to have been poisoned with a nerve agent in their house in Salisbury, The Telegraph reports.

The investigators came to this conclusion because one of the 21 casualties resulting from the attempt on Skripal – local police officer Nick Bailey – was hospitalized with severe poisoning after visiting the Skripal house after identifying the victims found in the city park. It was initially reported that the sergeant was poisoned after finding Skripal and his daughter unconscious outside the Maltings Mall in Salisbury. However, the paramedic who provided first aid to the victims on the spot was not injured.

Last night, it became known that 180 specialists in the chemical protection of the British Armed Forces were sent to disinfect potentially dangerous objects. Sky News reported that policemen in chemical protection suits took away flowers from the grave of Skripal’s wife and son in Salisbury, which the poisoned relatives had brought there shortly before the incident.

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Military come to the aid of the police

To recall, 21 people sought medical treatment after the poisoning of former GRU Colonel Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yuliya.

Skripal and his daughter were found unconscious on a bench at the Maltings Mall in Salisbury. It was found that they had been poisoned with a rare nerve agent, the name of which has yet to be disclosed by the police. The police qualify the incident as an assassination attempt. It is reported that shortly before being poisoning, Skripal contacted the police fearing for his life.

According to a lead, Russian special services could have had a hand in the poisoning of the former colonel, convicted for espionage in Russia. However, British Foreign Secretary urged “not to jump to conclusions.”

Sergei Skripal served in the Russian General Staff Main Military Intelligence Directorate until 1999. He resigned as a colonel. In 2006, he was sentenced to 13 years’ colony for espionage in favor of Britain. In 2010, President Dmitry Medvedev pardoned him, after which, in the framework of exchange of spies with the US, he was sent to the United Kingdom, where he was granted asylum. As reported by Financial Times citing a source in special services, after moving to the UK, Skripal collaborated with the special services of the country and the intelligence of other Western countries, providing them with information about the activities of their former colleagues. 

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