Ever more Russians want freedom of speech and justice

Ever more Russians want freedom of speech and justice

Russians have been standing for their rights more aggressively since the controversial pension reform, worsened financial situation and social unrest against the background of the elections to the Moscow City Duma.

The demand for a fair trial, freedom of speech and peaceful assemblies has been on the upward trend among Russian citizens. As follows from a Levada Center survey cited by Kommersant, Russians have been talking more often than before about their rights, which had not been of much importance to most of them earlier.

The right to life is the number one concern of Russian people (an increase from 72% to 78% compared with 2017), followed by medical care (70%), and a fair trial (from 64% to 50%). The number of those wishing to participate in the public and political life of the country has doubled (from 16% to 30%). The demand for freedom of speech is now voiced by 58% of respondents against 34% in 2017. 28% (against 13% in 2017) said they wanted the right to peaceful assemblies.

Russians have been standing for their rights more aggressively since the controversial pension reform, worsened financial situation and social unrest against the background of the elections to the Moscow City Duma, Levada Center sociologist Karina Pipia told the newspaper.

In addition, people have become more concerned about their rights to the inviolability of property (57% against 46%), rest (52% against 39%) and ownership of property (50% against 40%).

Levada Center conducted the home-by-home study from October 24 to 30, 2019. They asked 1616 people in 137 settlements of 50 regions of the country.

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