Putin ordered Prosecutor General's Office to check Federal Penitentiary Service’s work

Putin ordered Prosecutor General's Office to check Federal Penitentiary Service’s work
Vladimir Putin

President Vladimir Putin has instructed the Prosecutor General's Office to check the work of the Federal Penitentiary Service. This is reported in the list of instructions issued following the meeting of the Human Rights Council, published on the Kremlin website.

The Prosecutor General's Office will have to check whether the Federal Penitentiary Service complies with the law on public control over ensuring human rights in places of detention. In particular, the agency will check the FPS’s work with members of public monitoring commissions. Prosecutor General Yuri Chaika is responsible for the execution of the order. In early September, the Prosecutor General's Office will have to submit a report on the check results.

Putin’s other orders include checking the law enforcement practice related to the work of NGOs recognized as foreign agents. This task falls to the Presidential Administration and the Ministry of Justice. Persons responsible for the execution of the order are First Deputy Head of Presidential Administration Sergey Kirienko, President's Special Representative for Environmental Management, Ecology and Transport Sergey Ivanov, and Head of the Ministry of Justice Aleksandr Konovalov.

Putin has also ordered to examine "the effectiveness of measures to guarantee judicial independence, openness, and transparency in the administration of justice." Responsibility for this order has been assigned to Human Rights Commissioner Tatyana Moskalkova, Head of the Human Rights Council Mikhail Fedotov, Prosecutor General Yury Chaika, and Head of the Supreme Court Vyacheslav Lebedev.

The list contains a total of nine orders.

The meeting of the Human Rights Council members and President took place on December 8 at the Kremlin. At the meeting, journalist Elena Masyuk told Putin that the Public Chamber had not included some of the participants in the Public Monitoring Commission, i.e. the organization that checks detention centers and colonies. According to her, this led to PMC’s operation being "virtually destroyed" in 42 regions. She asked President to draw attention to the formation of the PMC.

"In my opinion, and in the opinion of many people who have been associated with the PMC, in recent years, the Public Chamber may not form public monitoring commissions. The PC is an unprofessional formation of unknown origin; therefore, in our opinion, it is the Human Rights Commissioner and the Presidential Council on Human Rights – people who are directly related to human rights – which should be responsible for public commissions formation," she said.

Putin noted that the system should be "adjusted."

In late October, a new composition of the PMC of Moscow was elected. Member of Board of the Memorial Human Rights Centre Anna Karetnikova, who had worked in the PMC for nine years, was not included in the Commission. The Public Chamber Council did not support her candidacy.

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