Russian police detained 'Moldovan scheme' participant in Plakhotnyuk and Platon's case

Russian police detained 'Moldovan scheme' participant in Plakhotnyuk and Platon's case
Vladimir Plakhotnyuk

The Victoriabank shareholder participated in the scheme for money laundering in Moldovan banks.

Employees of the Investigation Department of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia detained a resident of the Moscow region, Alexander Korkin, as part of the investigation of a criminal case under Art. 210 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (Creation of a Criminal Community) and 193.1 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (Illegal export of capital under false documents), the MIA press service reported. He was arrested on February 8, but it became known only now. His defense has already filed an appeal on a chosen measure of restraint in the Moscow City Court, but the consideration of the complaint has not yet been scheduled.

Alexander Korkin was a shareholder of Victoriabank - the first commercial bank of Moldova, established in 1989. The bank’s owner is considered the Head of the Democratic Party of Moldova, Vladimir Plakhotnyuk, whom the ICR accuses in absentia of creating a criminal group to prepare an assassination attempt on his political opponent Renato Usaty. Plakhotnyuk is also a defendant in a case of money laundering through the 'Moldovan scheme.' His partner was Vyacheslav Platon, whom a Chisinau court sentenced him to 18 years in prison in 2017. The investigation proved his guilt in money laundering and embezzlement on a particularly large scale. According to investigators, Platon stole about a billion lei ($ 50 million at the then exchange rate). He called his sentence a “political trial,” and pointed to his former business partner Vladimir Plakhotnyuk as the customer of the case against him.

According to the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia, citizens of Russia and Moldova created an international criminal community "in order to carry out large-scale illegal currency transactions." The organizers of the 'laundry' are believed to be Vladimir Plakhotnyuk and Vyacheslav Platon, who have Russian citizenship. During 2013 and 2014, on far-fetched grounds and forged documents, they transferred money from the accounts of Zapadny bank and Russian Land Bank, which are under their control, to the accounts of non-residents - BC Moldindconbank S.A. and other companies under the pretext of selling currency. The money received in Russian rubles was debited from the correspondent accounts of Russian banks in BC Moldindconbank S.A. on counterfeit decisions of the courts of the Republic of Moldova in favor of foreign individuals and legal entities (non-residents). In total, upwards of 37 billion rubles ($ 564.7 m) were funneled from Russia.

Back in November 2015, The CrimeRussia revealed a money laundering scheme through the 'Moldovan scheme' through Bank de Economii and Moldindconbank. The former member of the Moldovan parliament, Vyacheslav Platon, controlled Moldindconbank, being its majority shareholder, and the former Vice President of the National Bank of Moldova (NBM), Emma Tebyrtse (detained in 2016), managed the banks. The scheme was controlled by Vladimir Plakhotnyuk. From the Russian side, the Russian 'cashier' Alexander Grigoryev took part in the scheme. In 2012-2014, his Russian Land Bank became one of the leaders in terms of suspicious operations with Moldindconbank. Then about $ 4.5 billion passed through it. In October 2015, Grigoryev was detained by Russian law enforcement officers. However, in another case - on withdrawal of funds from Doninvest bank.

According to the former Deputy Chief of the Service for the Prevention and Combating of Money Laundering at the National Center for Combating Corruption, Mikhail Gofman, Moldova has become an offshore, in which billions of dollars roll out. The main benefits of this situation were reaped by businesspeople Vladimir Plakhotnyuk and Vyacheslav Platon, as well as some influential people from Russia featured in the famous 'Magnitsky list.'

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