Prosecutor-General’s Office to work on criminal case related to Yakobashvili’s ex-partner who commenced searches in his museum

Prosecutor-General’s Office to work on criminal case related to Yakobashvili’s ex-partner who commenced searches in his museum
David Yakobashvili

Co-owner of the Yeysk port elevator Boris Minakhi is suspected of abuse of power.

The Krasnodar region’s Prosecutor-General’s Office has reversed the decision on termination of a criminal case against a co-owner of the Yeysk port elevator Boris Minakhi, its CEO Omar Omarov and “a group of parties” who are suspected of abuse of power (item 1 of article 201 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation), reports RBC with reference to a source familiar with the papers of the case and a representative of Krasnodar Prosecutor-General’s Office.

Representative of the Office says the papers of the case were forwarded to Prosecutor-General’s Office for examination.

The criminal case against Minakhi and Omarov was initiated in May, 2018, on the complaint of an ex-owner of the Yeysk port elevator David Yakobashvili who accused Minakhi, his spouse Yekaterina Fedorova and Omarov of damage to the company estimated at 300 million rubles ($4.7 million) by taking out of funds. Source of RBC says that after this information was disclosed, the United cereal company (OZK) that owned 46 per cent of the elevator decided to sell its share. In August, 2015, OZK put a portfolio with the initial price worth of 830 million rubles ($12 million) up for auction. Fedorova won the auction, but did not meet the obligations, so the agreement was dissolved and the auction - carried out once again. In July, 2016, Petrotek company tied to Yakobashvili purchased 46 per cent of the elevator for 980 million rubles ($15.5 million). 

In June, 2019, special investigator of the investigative unit of the Main Investigations Directorate of the Main Directorate of the Ministry of the Interior of the Russian Federation in the Krasnodar region terminated the case against Minakhi, Fedorova and Omarov “in the absence of a complaint by a victim.” The decision on termination of the case was reversed following complaints by Yakobashvili’s lawyers forwarded to the Prosecutor-General’s Office.

Minakhi was earlier reported to have complained about Yakobashvili with the Federal Security Service. He accused him of an attempt of a corporate raid of the elevator. Criminal case into swindling (article 159 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation) was initiated upon this complaint. In June, this year, searches were carried out in Yakobashvili’s Sobranie museum located on Moscow’s Solyanka street. Yakobashvili’s acquaintance told that the businessman had borrowed Minakhi (he had known for more than 40 years) the controlling block of shares of the elevator, however Minakhi had not given it back.

At the present time, Yakobashvili is in Europe, Minakhi is in the U.S. Minakhi is a citizen of the U.S. Yakobashvili earlier stated he would not return to Russia.

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