Employees of Federal Security Service carry out searches at David Yakobashvili’s Collection museum

Employees of Federal Security Service carry out searches at David Yakobashvili’s Collection museum
David Yakobashvili

According to some reports, the investigative actions are being carried out due to a criminal case opened on the complaint of Yakobashvili’s former business partner Boris Minakhi.

Employees of the Federal Security Service have carried out searches at David Yakobashvili’s Collection museum located on Moscow’s Solyanka street, reports RBC with reference to a familiar businessman and a source close to the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs the president of which is the businessman.

According to sources of RBC, the investigative actions are being carried out due to a criminal case opened by the Federal Security Service on the complaint of Yakobashvili’s former business partner Boris Minakhi. Minakhi is reported to have turned to a head of the Federal Security Service Aleksander Bortnikov with the complaint regarding an attempt of an illegal takeover of Port elevator of Eisk city. According to the source, Yakobashvili loaned shares of the elevator to Minakhi whom he “had been known for more than 40 years.”

According to the data base of the System of Professional Analysis of Markets and Firms, Boris Minakhi owns 1.68 per cent of Port elevator of Eisk city and 46 per cent of United corn company; other 25 per cent are owned by Yekaterina Fedorova.

Yakobashvili’s acquaintance told RBC that Minakhi had a disagreement with United corn company related to the amount of investment in the business. United corn company carried out auction related to its portfolio in the elevator. Minakhi won it, but “refused to finance the bargain.” As a result, Yakobashvili had to pay out $18 million for the elevator’s shares.

In late October, 2018, Minakhi lost the lawsuit to Yakobashvili at Moscow’s Tagansky district court. He demanded a loan worth of $4.7 million from the businessman, having made mention of the fact that in 2010, they had tied up 4 credit agreements. The court rejected the claim.

The court’s decision states that it can be concluded from Yakobashvili’s explanations that he “had never borrowed money from Minakhi, as he had never felt the need of it; and its vice versa - Minakhi had borrowed money from him on a permanent basis and never provided any back-up documents and given it back partially; by the time, he has not returned the total of his debt.” The court concluded that the copies of 3 loan agreements provided by Minakhi had been made by electronic editing with use of electronic digital pictures of the signature on behalf of B.Minakhi and signature on behalf of D.Yakobashvili. The court did not determine that a copy of the fourth agreement had been made by editing, however there was no signature on behalf of B.Minakhi.

The court had repeatedly offered Minakhi to provide the original agreement, however the latter did not do it. Due to this fact, the court found Yakobashvili’s complaints reasoned and concluded that Minakhi had never borrowed him money.

Yakobashvili’s acquaintance says at the present time, the businessman is Geneva at the Forum of the United nations where he is expected to deliver his speech related to labor legislation.

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