Ukrainian security officials talk with Gela Tbilissky about his return to Georgia 

Ukrainian security officials talk with Gela Tbilissky about his return to Georgia
Gela Tbilissky in the deportation center of Chernigov with other thieves in law

Georgia is known for its harsh legislation in relation to thieves in law and members of the thievish community.

The first deputy head of the National Police of Ukraine, Vyacheslav Abroskin, posted a video of conversations with the Georgian thief in law Gela Dzhodzhua, better known as Gela Tbilissky, on his Facebook page. The mob said he wants to return to his homeland.

“Thief in law Gela Tbilissky was the first to speak with the police about supporting his return to the homeland. He would like to become a citizen of our country a year ago,” wrote Abroskin.

Earlier, Abroskin reported that the 53-year-old Georgian mob, who had been at the point of stay for foreigners and stateless persons in Chernihiv, was in the city psychiatric hospital. The thief in law, according to the police, simulated mental disorder.

According to Abroskin, the thief in law begins to “get very sick” every time it comes to his return to Georgia.

“After entering the point for the stay of foreigners and stateless persons in Chernihiv, this villain remotely coordinates criminal groups specializing in thefts of vehicles and apartments,” Abroskin writes on his page. He adds that they are happy to help him return to his homeland. Georgia is known for its harsh legislation in relation to the thieves in law and members of the thieves' community. Thus, titled thieves in law face from 9 to 15 years in prison, and belonging to the thieves' world is punishable by imprisonment for a term of 7 to 10 years.

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