Crab-eater and member of Tsapki gang transferred to colony in Omsk

Crab-eater and member of Tsapki gang transferred to colony in Omsk
Viacheslav Tsepovyaz (center)

Lawyers note that it is not explained what caused the transfer of Viacheslav Tsepovyaz.

Member of a gang Tsapki Viacheslav Tsepovyaz who had earlier been serving his sentence in a correctional facility #3 in the Amur region has been transferred to a colony in Omsk, reports TASS with reference to a lawyer of his former spouse Natalia Strishneva who’s suing him in a case into a land property.

Tsepovyaz had earlier been serving his sentence in a correctional facility #3 in the Amur region’s Ivanovsky district. In autumn, 2018, the accused found himself at the center of a scandal due to a photo that shows him eating crab meat, caviar, and barbecue in the colony. Violations - such as loosening up of the regime, illegal providing of dates, transfers and dispatches, as well as medical services requiring payment - were found in the facility. The prosecutor's investigation in March, 2019, concluded that the violations had been eliminated.

Lawyer Eduard Churgulia says Tsepovyaz has been in Omsk for a few months now.

“The recent suits he applied feature a colony in Omsk as an address for correspondence,” the lawyer stated. He notes that it is not explained what caused the transfer of Viacheslav Tsepovyaz. He thinks it is likely to be connected with carrying out of investigative activities in criminal cases initiated against officials. It was reported that a criminal case had been initiated due to the violations in the Amur regions-based colony. After that, Tsepovyaz was transferred to a remand prison in Khabarovsk.

Viacheslav Tsepovyaz was a member of a gang Tsapki headed by Sergey Tsapok. The gang had been ‘terrorizing’ a settlement of Kushchevskaya in the Krasnodar region for a long time. In 2010, the criminals dealt with a family comprised of 12 persons (including 4 children). After that, law enforcement forces destroyed the gang. Tsepovyaz was sentenced to 20 years behind bars, however, later, it was shortened to 19 years and 10 months.

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